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Halted adoption process leaves Utah woman stuck in Haiti

PROVO, Utah — A Provo, Utah woman said she and several other American families living in Haiti are unable to come back to the United States due to a halted adoption process.

Utah woman in Haiti says adoption authority was ransacked

Erika Charles has been trying to adopt twin 6-year-old girls for as long as they have been alive. A few weeks ago, the country’s central adoption authority was ransacked, which has become an issue for many families trying to adopt Haitian children.

Charles has been living in Haiti for more than a decade. What she said started as a short volunteer stint turned into something long-term.

“I started a mental health organization. I work with a team of Haitian psychologists, and we provide mental health education, mental health advocacy awareness, as well as direct individual and group support to Haitians throughout the country,” she said.

Halted adoption process leaves Utah woman stuck in Haiti

BY BRIANNA CHAVEZ


 

KSLNewsRadio

PROVO, Utah — A Provo, Utah woman said she and several other American families living in Haiti are unable to come back to the United States due to a halted adoption process.

Utah woman in Haiti says adoption authority was ransacked

Firsthand: Born in S'pore & adopted by US couple, woman, 27, now searching for father she never knew

Growing up, it was never a secret Bailey McNamee was adopted.

Her family are blonde-haired, blue-eyed Caucasians. She has brown eyes, brown hair, and brown skin.

 

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She thought her mother gave her away. Like thousands of Chileans, she was taken

María Hastings, and others adoptees like her, are reuniting with their biological families in Chile


María Hastings, 37, has always known she was adopted. But didn't know that her mother didn't give her up willingly. On Sunday she met her biological family for the first time in Santiago, Chile. She spoke to As It Happens guest host Peter Armstrong.  6:27

 

When María Hastings landed at the airport in Santiago, Chile, on Sunday to meet her biological family for the first time, she said she felt "a little numb."

But that changed when she walked out of customs and saw her birth mother, sister and two nieces waiting there for her. 

Three Ethiopian Belgians testify: unfortunately, adoption is not a feel-good story

https://www.demorgen.be/meningen/drie-ethiopische-belgen-getuigen-adoptie-is-helaas-geen-feelgoodverhaal~b47f10d5/?fbclid=IwAR1WEmi1lq36d2RLOWFuZ180dq7qe5Rg9AcekzayMMrKlW9-GDhKR1j2fQs&referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fm.facebook.com%2F&referrer=https://l.facebook.com/&utm_campaign=shared_earned&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook

Shashitu Rahima Tarirga, Thereza De Wannemaeker and Temesgen Mees were adopted from Ethiopia.

SHASHITU RAHIMA TARIRGA , THEREZA DE WANNEMAEKER AND TEMESGEN MEES February 21, 2024, 3:00 am

Through the VRT documentary Francisco Desir, the audience gets an insight into the emotional journey of adoption. For us adoptees, the emotions that Francisco goes through are all too recognizable. It takes a lot of courage to start the search for your first family. As adoptees, we can only applaud the fact that Francisco wants to share this quest with the general public.

Thoughtful opinions, sharp pens. All unmissable opinion pieces in your mailbox every week.

Right To Adopt Not A Fundamental Right, Prospective Adoptive Parents Can't Demand Their Choice Of Who To Adopt: Delhi High Court

The Delhi High Court has ruled that the right to adopt cannot be raised to the status of a fundamental right within Article 21 of the Constitution of India, nor can it be raised to a level granting Prospective Adoptive Parents (PAPs) the right to demand their choice of who to adopt. Justice Subramonium Prasad said that there is no right at all to insist on the adoption of a particular 

Biological sisters meet for first time as illegally adopted child reunites with family

There were emotional reunions and long embraces at the airport in Chile’s capital on Sunday 18 February as families met face-to-face with some of the adults who were illegally put up for adoption as children.

Romina Cortés hugged her sister, Maria Hastings, whose existence she learned of just a month ago.

Maria is one of tens of thousands of Chilean children who were trafficked or illegally put up for adoption during the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet.

She now lives in Tampa, Florida.

The illegal adoptions – 20,000 of which are being investigated, according to Chile’s justice system and other social groups – extend back to the 1960s.

Woman reunited with family after illegal adoption

The illegal adoptions — 20,000 of which are being investigated by Chilean justice officials and other social groups — extend back to the 1960s. Largely poor, young and indigenous women in vulnerable situations were either forced to give up their children or were told they died shortly after childbirth.


 

Apathy Towards Child Protection Can Perpetuate Cycles Of Abuse: Bombay High Court Orders State To Fill Vacancies In Child Welfare Institutions

Warning that neglect in safeguarding the rights and well-being of children could perpetuate cycles of abuse and hinder educational opportunities, the Bombay High Court recently directed the State government to fill vacancies in various child welfare institutions within three months. This includes posts in the Maharashtra State Commission for Protection of Child Rights, State Child...